Seven in 7 – Agile @ Scale, Maturing AI, The Ring of Success, Defending Democracy and More…

 

Agile at scale

As we head into the TCS UK Innovation Forum this week, I’m preparing myself to discuss big ideas and disruptive changes. With that in mind, this week’s Seven in 7 looks at scaling AI, a startup that was bought for a billion dollars, and hacking democracy. But also, as we’re committed to becoming agile as an organisation, where better to start, than at the great article in the new HBR about how to drive agile at scale!
(1) Doing Agile at Scale 
This is a very timely look at Agile adoption at scale in the enterprise. It starts with enshrining Agile values in leadership roles, which requires a continuous approach to strategy. The next key thing is a clear taxonomy of initiatives which may be classified into 3 categories: customer experiences, business processes, and IT systems. The next step is sequencing the initiatives, with a clear understanding of timelines. It can take 5-7 years for real business impact, but there should be immediate customer value. Enterprise systems such as SAP can be delivered using agile as well. But it needs the organisation to create and move with a common rhythm. There are businesses working in agile who use hundreds of teams, solve large problems, and build sophisticated products. This can be made easier with modular products and operating architectures – which essentially mean the plug and play capabilities of individual components. It’s important to have shared priorities and financial empowerment of teams. Talent acquisition management needs to be reshaped to meet the new needs. And funding of projects and initiatives needs to be seen as ‘options for further discovery’. After all, at the heart of agile is the ability to proceed with a clear vision but without necessarily knowing all the steps to get there.
(2) Artificial Intelligence At Scale – for non-technology firms
It’s clear that Tech firms from Google, to Amazon and Twitter, have all been able to deploy AI at scale – in enabling recommendations, analysis and predictive behaviour. For non-tech firms too, the time may have come for delivering scaled AI. One of the key areas where AI seems to be ready to scale is around computer vision (image and video analysis) – relevant to insurance, security, or agribusinesses. The article below from the Economist also quotes TCS’s Gautam Shroff, who runs the NADIA chatbot project. A critical assertion the article makes is that implementing AI is not the same as installing a Microsoft program. This might be obvious, but what is less so, is that AI programs by design get better with age, and may be quite rudimentary at launch. Businesses looking to implement AI may need to play across multiple time horizons. And while the short-term opportunity and temptation is to focus on costs, there role of AI in creating new value is clearly much bigger.
(3) The Ring of Success:

What makes a new product successful? I met Jamie, the founder of Ring a couple of years ago in London and was struck by his directness and commitment. He even appears in his company’s ads. Ring.com was recently acquired by Amazon for $1bn. Here one of the backers of Ring talks about the factors which made Ring a success. In a nutshell, the list includes (1) the qualities of the founder, (2) execution focus and excellence, (3) continuous improvements, (4) having a single purpose, (5) pricing and customer value. (6) integration of hardware and software. (7) clarity about the role of the brand.
(4) Blockchain and ICO redux:

Do you know your Ethereum from your Eos or your MIATA from your Monero? This piece from the MIT Tech Review will sort you out. And for those of you who are still struggling to understand what exactly blockchain is, here’s a good primer. Of course, you could always go look at my earlier blog post on everything blockchain.
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(5) X and Z – The Millennial Sandwich

X & Z: Or the millennial sandwich. All the talk in the digital revolves around millennial, but there is a generation on either side. The generation X – followed the baby boomers, and it turns out they have a better handle on traditional leadership values than millennial. This article talks about Generation X at work.
On the other side, there’s a generation after the millennials – the generation Z. They’re the ones who don’t have TV’s, don’t do facebook, and live their lives on mobile phones. This article talks about how Financial services are being shaped by Gen Z.
(6) Big tech validates Industry 4.0

This week, the large tech players disclosed significant earnings, beating expectations and seeing share prices surge. In a way it’s a validation of the industry 4.0 model – the abundance of capital, data, and infrastructure will enable businesses to create exponential value, despite the challenges of regulation, data stewardship issues and other problems.  Amazon still has headroom because when push comes to shove, Amazon Prime, which includes all you can consume music and movies can probably increase prices still more.
(7) Defending Democracy

The US elections meets the technology arms race – this article presents experiences from a hacking bootcamp., run for the teams who manage elections. While the details are interesting, there is a larger story here – more than influencing the elections either way, the greater harm this kind of election hacking wreaks is in its ability to shake people’s faith in democracy. As always, there’s no other answer than being prepared, but that’s easier said than done!
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