The Future of Retail: How Will You Fight Amazon?

What to do when the elephant in the room is a 600-pound gorilla?

digital-retail

Once upon a time, there were 4 high street electronic retailers. Now, they are one. Dixons Carphone, which also includes PCWorld and Currys, now employs some 42,000 people and manages 17 brands across Europe. Yet, while the company continues to innovate and do a lot of the things you would expect from a leading retailer, they are fighting a very different kind of opponent. Like the movie Predator, this is an almost invisible creature, capable of superhuman strength, focus, and accuracy. This is Amazon.

It’s not just retail, the story is repeating itself in other segments too. In some cases, the commercial model has changed as well – for high street music retailers, see Apple and Spotify. For Blockbusters, it’s Netflix. But for most categories, such as for Book chains like Borders, its still Amazon. And given Amazon’s relentless strategy of growth and customer intimacy before profits, its the question every retailer must ask – how to compete with Amazon?

Everyone knows a few legends about Amazon. Many are about the maniacal customer focus – how Jeff Bezos and his family spent Christmas packing gifts by hand. Or how, when asked about why Analysts weren’t buying his stock, he said that as long as customers were buying his products, he didn’t care if analysts bought the stock. The fact is that Amazon is the 600-pound gorilla in the retail business. In 2015. 50% of all e-commerce growth in the US went to Amazon.

What lies behind Amazon’s relentless growth? A combination of the obvious and perhaps less obvious. Global distribution centres, world leading warehouse automation, customer experience par excellence, recommendation engines, one-click purchasing. Kindle readers, prime membership, all you can eat subscriptions. All of this is known and well documented. But there are three key areas where perhaps less attention is paid.

First, Amazon is arguably the worlds most effective innovation company. Its string of relevant and successful innovations from automated warehouses to Amazon Echo, speak for themselves. Second: Amazon deeply understands what it means to be truly committed to an excellent customer experience – and they execute this across payments, site design, offers, delivery, and returns. Third, and most importantly it’s a digital native company. This means that all its core processes are run by software and algorithms, rather than people. Software behaves more consistently, doesn’t suffer fatigue or human errors, and can be improved relatively easily, compared to upskilling humans. Amazon can decide where to introduce human intervention rather than worry about where to automate.

Quite a few brick and mortar businesses have enjoyed success in the past decade, in the UK, through differing strategies. Tesco’s rise and fall with the Dunnhumby data business have been well documented. John Lewis continues to focus on customer service delivered via its partnership model. Halfords focuses on the cycling and travel niche. Each of these businesses will face the same Amazon question and have to figure out how to compete, especially if Amazon decides to open physical stores in future.

So How Should Brick & Mortar Stores Fight Amazon? Here’s a starting 5 point list:

  1. Dominate your segment – make sure that you define a sustainable market (e.g. kitchenware in the UK) and can be the dominant brick and mortar store in that segment, or as consolidation sets in, the last one standing.
  2. Build a strong digital proposition – one that spans the web and mobile, both deeply integrated into your business model. make sure you invest both in digital marketing and in your e-commerce platform. Exploit online communities and design around customer needs.
  3. Build powerful experiences which cannot be created online. Tactile, immersive and human experiences, which can exploit your physical store. You may redesign significant parts of your physical store and even allow customers to comparison shop and complete the purchase online, in some cases.
  4. Bring your physical and digital retail universes together – and ensure that this omnichannel experience becomes a source of data for sharpening your customer experience, in addition to contributing to your sales and profits.
  5. Automate your core processes – from merchandising, offers, check out, payment, delivery and returns, and then focus specifically on where human inputs will improve the process. Invest in developing algorithms that are valuable to your business.

Of course, this is only a beginning and you’ll need to keep investing and building competence in any number of new areas. Some that spring to mind include: trust models, building strong data stewardship, creating a lifetime value of customers, providing technical support for the increasingly smart products you’re likely to be stocking, creating new commercial models – perhaps around the idea of leasing or renting rather than outright purchase, understanding immediacy and real-time business models, advanced security modelling, designing of smart experiences, and deep supply chain visibility – these are just some of the areas you will want to ensure you understand well.

We should also expect to see other market patterns emerge – for example, corner shops/ convenience stores could be pulled together with a common platform which allows them to run independently but provide a shared platform for online & mobile ordering, stocking, supply chain and even leasing drones for delivery. After all, you would go to your corner shop when you need something quickly – when your sugar runs out, in the middle of making tea, for example. What better way for them to deliver to these urgent needs by having drones drop a packet of sugar to your doorstep even before you finish making the tea?

Because of course, if corner shops won’t do it, and the high street groceries dilly dally, this is something Amazon are already planning to do. And frankly, as a consumer, I’ll go to whoever meets my needs in the most painless way.