20 Takeaways From The CogX Event, London

IMG_5043First, a clarification. I visit events such as the CogX events to be stimulated, to have new thoughts and to have the neurons in my brain fired in new ways. I go to learn, not to network. So I agonise over sessions to attend, and importantly the sessions I miss. Of which there is an overwhelming majority, as this event was running 5–7 conference tracks at any time, as well as a lot of other small stage events. By and large though it’s a weirdly monastic experience, surrounded by people, but very much alone in my head, to the point where I’m actually a little bit annoyed when somebody wants to talk to me! This then is the list of things that made me think.

  1. If there was one session that made attending the event worthwhile for me, it was Zavain Dar’s session on the New Radical Empiricism (NRE). His argument is that the traditional scientific method is based on certain rational assumptions — which are now challenged. In the classic method, you would hypothesise that the earth was round, find the right experiments to run, collect data and prove/ disprove your hypothesis. This runs into trouble when the computational models are too complex and / or changing too often — such as gene sequencing or macroeconomic data. Also this is not efficient when the range of options is vast and we don’t know what data might be relevant — e.g. curing cancer. The traditional methods may yield results, but it might take a lifetime of research and work to get there. What Dar calls the NRE is the opposite — a data driven view which allows machine learning to build hypotheses based on patterns it finds in the data. So in the NRE world, rather than starting with whether the earth is round, you would share a lot of relevant astronomical data and ask the machine to discover the shape of the world. This approach works best in areas where we have a data explosion such as genomics and computational biology. Or where there is plenty of data but is shackled by traditional hypotheses based methods, such as macroeconomics. An additional problem that NRE solves is where the problem space is simply to complex for human minds to compute — both the examples above are instances of this complexity. You may know that Radical Empiricism is by itself a construct from the late 19th century by William James — which eschews intuition and insists on physical experiences and concrete evidence to support cause and effect. Its worth noting that there are plenty of examples of environments where quantifiable data is not yet abundant, where experts still follow the traditional method driven by hypotheses. VC investing, ironically, is such an area!
  2. This also led to a discussion on Deeptech led by Azeem Azhar of Exponential View and panelists from Lux, Kindred Capital and Episode1 Ventures. Deeptech is defined from an investment perspective as companies and start ups who are building products which involve technical risk. Not using existing tech to solve new problems. Usually involving products and ideas which a few years ago would have to subsist on research grants and be housed by academic institutions.
  3. Jurgen Schmidhuber’s session on LSTM was another highlight. Schmidhuber’s PhD thesis on LSTM (Long Short Term Memory), in 1997 was a foundation of the AI advancement which was used by a number of technology products and subsequent development. Schmidhuber presented an excellent timeline of the evolution of AI in the past 20 years and ended with a long view where he explored the role of AI and ML in helping us reach resources that were not on earth but scattered across the solar system, the galaxy and beyond. And how we might perceive today’s technology and advancement in a few thousand years.
  4. One of Schmidhuber’s other points was around curiosity driven learning. Mimicking the way an infant learns, by exploring his or her universe. This is the idea that a machine can learn through observation and curiosity, about it’s environments.
  5. Joshua Gans, the author of Prediction Machines, and professor of Economics and Tech Innovation, talked about AI doing to prediction what computers did to arithmetic. Essentially they dramatically reduced the cost of complex arithmetical operations. AI does the same for prediction or inference. Which is essentially making deductions about the unknown based on the known. And bringing down the cost of prediction has a massive impact on decision making because that’s what we’re doing 80% of the time, at work, as managers.
  6. Moya Green, the CEO of Royal Mail talked about the transformation that Royal Mail went through — including an increase in technology team size from 60 to over 550 people. She also made the comment that most managers still under-appreciate the value of tech, and overestimate their organisations capability to change, and absorb new tech.
  7. Deep Nishar of Softbank used an excellent illustrative example of how AI is being used to provide personalised cover art for albums by digital streaming and media providers, based on users choices and preferences.
  8. Jim Mellon, long time investor and current proselytiser of life-extending tech suggested that Genomics would be a bigger breakthrough than semiconductors. He was joined by the chief data officer for Zymergen, which works on bio-manufactured products, based on platforms which work with microbial and genetic information.
  9. A very good data ethics panel pondered the appropriate metaphors for data. We’ve all heard the phrase data is the new oil. Yet that may be an inadequate descriptor. Experts on the panel posited metaphors such as ‘hazardous material’, ‘environment’, ’social good’ etc. because each of these definitions are useful in understanding how we should treat data. Traditional property based definitions are limited and it was mentioned that US history has plenty of examples of trying to correct social injustice via the property route (reservations for native Americans), which have not worked out. Hence we need these alternative metaphors. For example, the after-effects of data use is often misunderstood, and sometimes it needs to be quarantined or even destroyed, like hazardous material, according to Ravi Naik of ITN Solicitors.
  10. Michael Veale of the UCL suggested that ancient Greeks used to make engineers sleep under the bridges they built. This principle of responsibility for data products needs to be adopted for some of the complex products being built today by data engineers. Data use is very hard to control today, so rather than try and control it’s capture and exploitation, the focus perhaps should be on accountability and responsibility.
  11. Stephanie Hare made the excellent point that biometric data can’t be reset. You can reset your password or change your email, phone number, or even get a completely new ID. But you can’t get new biometrics (yet). This apparent permanence of of biometrics should give us pause to think even harder about how we collect and use it for identification, for example in the Aadhaar cards in India.
  12. Because of the inherently global flows of data and the internet, the environmental model is a good metaphor as well. Data is a shared resource. The lines of ownership are not always clear. Who owns the data generated by you driving a hired car on a work trip? You? Your employer? The car company? The transport system? Clearly a more collective approach is needed and much like social goods, such as the environment, these models need to validate the shared ownership of data and it’s joint stewardship by all players in the ecosystem.
  13. Stephanie Hare, who is French Historian by education provided the chilling example of how the original use vs ultimate use of data can have disastrous consequences. France had a very sophisticated census system and for reasons to do with it’s muslim immigrants from North Africa captured the religion of census correspondents. Yet, this information was used to round up all the jewish population and hand them over to the Nazis because that’s what the regime at the time felt justified in doing.
  14. On a much more current and hopeful note, I saw some great presentations by companies like Mapillary and SenSat, and Teralytics which focus on mapping cities with new cognitive tools. Especially for cities which are of less interest to tech giants, and using crowdsourced information and data, which may include mobile phone and wifi usage, or street level photographs all used with permission, for example.
  15. At a broader level, the smart cities discussions, strongly represented by London (Theo Blackwell) and TFL (Lauren Sager Weinstein) shows the transition from connected to smart is an important one. Very good examples by TFL on using permission based wifi tracking at platforms to give Line Managers for each of the tube lines much more sophisticated data on the movement of people, to make decisions about trains, schedules and crowd management, over and above the traditional ways which include CCTV footage or human observation on platforms.
  16. At a policy level, a point made by Rajiv Misra, CEO of Softbank Investment Advisors (aka the Vision Fund) is that while Europe leads in a lot of the academic and scientific work being done in AI, it lags in the commercial value derived by AI, notably to China and the US. A point echoed by the House of Lords report on AI which talks about the investments and commitment needed to sustain the lead the UK enjoys in AI, currently. Schmidhuber’s very specific solution was to mimic the Chinese model — i.e. identify a city and create an investment fund of $2bn to put into AI.
  17. I also sat through a few sessions on Chatbots and my takeaway is that chatbots are largely very much in the world of hype machines. There is very little ‘intelligence’ that it currently delivers. Most platforms rely on capturing all possible utterances and coding them into the responses. Even NLP is still at a very basic stage. This makes chatbots basically a design innovation — where instead of finding information yourself, you have a ‘single window’ through which to request all sorts of information. Perhaps its a good thing that the design challenges are getting fixed early, so that when intelligence does arrive, we won’t stumble around trying to design it.
  18. Within the current bot landscape, one useful model that I heard is ‘Treat a bot like a new intern that doesn’t know much’ and let it have a similar personality so that it provides responses that are appropriate and also sets expectations accordingly. It might just start with a ‘hello, I’m new so bear with me if I don’t have all the answers’, for example.
  19. Dr Julia Short, who has built Spot — a chatbot to handle workplace harassment provided a very interesting insight about the style of questions such a bot might ask. A police person’s questions on the one hand are all about capturing in detail exactly what happened and making sure that the respondent is clear and lucid about events, incidents, and the detail. A therapists questions and line of discussion on the other hand is all about helping a victim get over some the details and get on with their lives. This suggests that you need to be clear whether your bot is an extension of the law enforcement or a counselling body. It also suggests that you might want to do the former before the latter.
  20. A really important question that will not leave us is: what do we do if the data is biased? If we are conscious of certain biases which are to do with gender, race or age, then we can guard against them either at the data level or at the algorithmic level, but we also need to be able to detect biases. For example, the example which I’ve now read in a few places of how the leniency of sentences handed out by judges in juvenile courts in the US vary inversely with the time since the last meal of the judge.

Clearly all of this really represents under 20% of the great discussions over the 2 days. Please do add your own comments, takeaways and thoughts.

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Seven in 7: Amazon’s Infinite Monkey Theorem Defence, GDPR Impact on Innovation, Ocado’s Successful Transformation, and More…

Seven for 7: Alexa sends the wrong message; does GDPR take us backwards? Uber crash – design flaw; future gazing with Michio Kaku; AI Winners; Ocado transformation and Energy Industry Updates.

(1) Amazon Echo: message in a bottle

The technology story of the week is undoubtedly the one about Amazon Echo and the message it inadvertently sent. ICMYI, a couple in Oregon had a call from an acquaintance to say that Alexa had sent them a recording of a private conversation of the couple, without their permission, or even knowledge. Amazon’s explanation is that this is the rare combination scenarios where a normal conversation between the couple somehow triggered all the keywords and responses that made Alexa record, validate and send the conversation to the acquaintance. This feels like the equivalent of the money, typewriter and Shakespeare problem, only, it’s not an infinite amount of time.

Here’s Amazon’s explanation: https://www.recode.net/2018/5/24/17391480/amazon-alexa-woman-secret-recording-echo-explanation

(2) GDPR  – impact on marketing and innovation.

I’m sure you’ve all received hundreds of emails in the past week exhorting you to stay in touch and re-sign up for all the emails you’ve been getting from people you didn’t know were sending you emails. But now that the moment has come, how will marketing work in a GDPR world? In one way this will take marketing backwards – as there is now a ban on algorithmic decision making based on behavioural data. It’s a moot point whether advertising falls into this category but companies may want to play it safe and in any case, the confusion will create a speed breaker in the short term. We may now be back in the world where if you’re watching or reading about champions league football you will see a beer ad irrespective of who you are. Not just marketing – a lot of innovation will also come under fire – both because of safety first practices, but also because some organisations will use GDPR as a shield for enabling innovation stifling practices, as highlighted by John Battelle of NewCo Shift. He argues that the regulation favours ‘at scale first parties’ – large tech platforms that provide you with a direct service such as Netflix, Facebook, or Uber – where users are likely to still give consent for data use more readily than to smaller, upcoming or relatively new and unproven services.

Dipayan Ghosh in the HBR – GDPR & advertising: https://hbr.org/2018/05/how-gdpr-will-transform-digital-marketing

John Battelle on GDPR & Innovation: https://shift.newco.co/how-gdpr-kills-the-innovation-economy-844570b70a7a

(3) Driverless / Uber/ Analysis

The analysis of Uber’s recent driverless crash has now thrown some light on what went wrong. And the answers aren’t great for Uber. In a nutshell, the problem is design and not malfunction. Which means that all the components did exactly what they were designed to do. Nothing performed differently and no components were at fault for failing to do their job. But as a collective, the design itself was flawed. The car had 6 seconds and 378 feet of distance to do something about the pedestrian crossing the street with her cycle. But it was confused about what the object was. The human in the car only engaged the steering 1 second before the crash and started breaking 1 second after the collision. The car was not designed to warn the human driver about any possible threats. A lot of the inbuilt safety systems in the Volvo vehicle including tracking driver alertness, emergency braking and collision avoidance, were disabled in the autonomous mode. In a nutshell, the responsibility lies with Uber’s design of autonomous cars. Uber has stopped testing in Arizona but has now started exploring flying taxis. Not a project that might fill you with confidence!

Uber crash analysis: https://sf.curbed.com/2018/5/25/17395196/uber-report-preliminary-arizona-crash-fatal

(4) A glimpse of the future: Michio Kaku & Jack Ma

The robotics industry will take over the automobile industry. Your car will become a robot – you will argue with it. Then your brain will also be robotised and brain net will allow emotions and feelings to be uploaded. You will be able to mentally communicate with things around you. Biotech allows us to create skin, bone, cartilage and organs. Alcoholics may be able to replace their livers with artificial ones. You may be able to scan store goods with a contact lens and see the profit margin on goods. The first 7 mins of this video tells you all of this through the eyes and experience of futurist Michio Kaku. Jack Ma (14 mins in) also talks about trusting the next generation. And how we are transitioning from the industrial era where we made people behave like machines, to a world where we are making machines behave like people. Believe the future before you see it, to be a leader, according to Ma.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1EZWYqm-5E&feature=youtu.be

(5) Who’s Winning The AI Game?

With the whole world hurtling towards an AI future, this piece looks at who exactly wins the AI game – across 7 different layers. It won’t surprise you to know that China is making amazing gains as a nation – their face recognition can pick out a wanted man in a crowd of 50,000. But it might surprise you to note that Nvidia’s stock is up 1500% in the past 2 years on the back of the success of their GPU chips. Meanwhile, Google is giving away Tensorflow free. All this points to a $3.9 tn market for enterprise AI in 2022. Are you ready for the challenge?

Who wins AI, across 7 layers
https://towardsdatascience.com/who-is-going-to-make-money-in-ai-part-i-77a2f30b8cef

(6) Ocado – digitally transformed.

When Ocado launched in 2000, it was on the heels of Webvan, a category of providers who set up to focus on eCommerce fulfilment, as an arm of Waitrose. Cut to 2018, and Ocado is a story of successful digital transformation. Ocado is today a provider of robotic technology for warehouse automation. Having become profitable in 2014, it now has a valuation of $5.3 bn and is set to become a part of the FTSE 100.

https://www.ajbell.co.uk/news/index-reshuffle-looks-set-deliver-ocado-ftse-100
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/may/17/us-deal-boosts-ocados-stock-market-value-above-5bn

(7) Understanding statistics: What medical research reports miss

When a drug is tested and the outcome suggests a 5% chance of a possible side effect, this does not mean that you have a 5% chance of being impacted if the drug is administered to you. It means there is a 5% chance that you will have the condition which leads to you having a 100% likelihood of being impacted. This is a subtle but very important distinction in how we interpret the data. But continuing down this stream of thought, it points to the lack of personalisation of medicine, not just the misinterpretation of data.
https://medium.com/@BlakeGossard/the-underrepresentation-of-you-in-medical-research-85289b591ba

 

Regulating Digital Businesses – Like Chasing Trains

chasing train

I don’t know if you’ve ever had the experience of running for a train that’s just started to move? I’ve had to do it a few times. Yes, I was younger and more foolish then. But it was usually within seconds of the train moving that I was on it. It’s only in old movies that you see the protagonists dashing down the platform as the train picks up speed. Usually, you just have the platform length and the problem is that the train is accelerating. There is a finite window of opportunity after which you’re just going to be left on the platform. This is my very long-winded analogy for regulators and technology. As technology accelerates – it’s getting harder for regulators to keep pace and in fact, in many areas they are just like the proverbial train chasers, running desperately after an accelerating train – often in a futile bid to control a business or industry that is on the verge of leaving the station of regulatory comfort. You can pick from a range of visual metaphors – a man trying to control seven unruly horses, or grabbing a tiger by the tail, but you get the idea. Regulators are in a fix.

The sight (and sounds) of the congressional hearing of Mark Zuckerberg did not bode well for regulators. They should have had Zuckerberg dead to rights over it’s (willing or unwilling) culpability in the Cambridge Analytica imbroglio. Yet he came out with barely a scar to show for 2 days of grilling. Many of the people asking him questions came across as the stereotypical grandparent trying to figure out the internet from their grandchild, even if these are very exaggerated caricatures. There is arguably a 40 year age gap between the average lawmaker and the average entrepreneur. But the age challenge is just a minor problem. Here are some bigger ones.

Technology businesses are shape-shifting enterprises invariably redefining industries. Platforms cannot be regulated like their industrial counterparts. Uber is not a taxi company. Facebook is not a media business. Airbnb is not a hotel. No matter how convenient it might be to classify and govern, or how often someone points out that the world’s biggest taxi company doesn’t have taxis. No, these are data and services platforms, and they need an entirely new definition. You could argue that the trouble with Facebook has come about because they were being treated like a media organisation, rather than a data platform. And let’s not forget that the only reason Facebook was in the dock is because of the success of Cambridge Analytica in actually influencing an election. Not for the misuse of customer data on a daily basis which may have gone on for months and years by Cambridge Analytica as well as other similar firms. While governments’ focus on Uber stems largely from incumbent and licensed taxi services, nobody seems to be worried that Uber knows the names, credit card details and the home and office residences of a majority of its users.

Tech businesses, even startups, are globally amorphous from a very early age. Even a 20 person startup barely out of its garage can be founded in California, have it’s key customers in Britain, its servers in Russia, its developers in Estonia and pay taxes in Ireland. Laws and governments are intrinsically country bound and struggle to keep up with this spread of jurisdiction. Just think of the number of torrent services that have survived by being beyond the reach of regulation.

These are known problems and have existed for a while. Here’s the next challenge which is a more fundamental and even an existential one for lawmakers. With the emergence of machine learning and AI, the speed of technology change is increasing. Metaphorically speaking, the train is about to leave the station. If regulators struggle with the speed and agility of technology companies today, imagine their challenge in dealing with the fast-evolving and non-determinate outcomes engendered by AI! And as technology accelerates, so do business models, and this impacts people, taxes, assets, and infrastructure. Imagine that a gig-economy firm that delivers food home builds an AI engine that routes its drivers and finds a routing mechanism that is faster but established as being riskier for the driver. Is there a framework under which this company would make this decision? How transparent would it need to be about the guidance it provides to its algorithms?

I read somewhere this wonderful and pithy expression for the challenge of regulation. A law is made only when it’s being broken. You make a law to officially outlaw a specific act or behaviour. Therefore the law can only follow the behaviour. Moreover, for most countries with a democratic process, a new law involves initial discussion with the public and with experts, crafting of terms, due debate across a number of forums and ultimately a voting process. This means we’re talking in months, not days and weeks. And if technology is to be effectively regulated and governed, a key challenge to address is the speed of law-making. Is it possible to create an ‘agile’ regulatory process? How much of the delay in regulation is because the key people are also involved with hundreds of other discussions. Would lawmaking work if a small group of people was tasked to focus on just one area and be empowered to move the process faster in an ‘agile’ manner? We are not talking about bypassing democratic processes, just moving through the steps as quickly as possible. A number of options are outlined in this piece from Nesta website – including anticipatory regulation (in direct contravention of the starting point of this paragraph), or iterative rather than definitive regulation. All of these have unintended consequences so we need to tread cautiously. But as with most businesses, continuing as present is not an option.

Then there’s the data challenge. The big technology platforms have endless access to data which allows them to analyse them and make smarter decisions. Why isn’t the same true of regulators and governments? What would true data-driven regulation look like? We currently have a commitment to evidence-driven policymaking in the UK (which has sometimes been unkindly called policy driven evidence making!) but it involves a manual hunt for supporting or contradicting data, which is again time-consuming. What if a government could analyse data at the speed of Facebook, and then present that to the experts, the public, and legislators in a transparent manner? The airline industry shares all the data about every incident, accident and near miss, across its ecosystem, competitors, and regulators, and this is a significant contributor to overall airline safety. (Outlined in the book Black Box Thinking, by Matthew Syed.) Why isn’t the same true for cybersecurity? Why isn’t there a common repository for all the significant cyber attacks, which can be accessed by regulators armed with data science tools and skills, so that they can spot trends, model the impact of initiatives and move faster to counter cyber attacks? If attacks seem to originate from a specific territory or impact a specific vulnerability of a product, pressure can be brought to bear on the relevant authorities to address those.

running after train
These are non-trivial challenges and we need to be aware of risks and unintended consequences. But there is no doubt that the time has come for us to think of regulation that can keep pace with the accelerating pace of change, or governments and regulators will start to feel like the protagonists of movies where people run after trains.