3 Easy Ways to Boost Your Mobile Strategy

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It’s 2016 and almost a decade since Steve Jobs put a ding in the universe with the launch of the first iPhone. A significant part of my life in that time has been spent in delivering better business outcomes using mobile technologies. And as the iPhone 7 blinks it’s baby eyes at the world, here are some of the things I’ve learnt about mobile strategies. (If you’re wondering whether business should have a mobile strategy or just a business strategy, let me just suggest that you need to have a clear roadmap and strategy for how you’re going to exploit the mobile ecosystem. What you call it is up to you!). Assuming you are a progressive organisation, I would expect to see the following three things happening in your business:

It’s NOT a marketing problem: There has been a historical tendency to look towards the CMO when we think about mobile solutions. But people who make the investment of effort, time and attention, to download the your app are usually your existing customers, looking to make it easier to deal with you. These are the also committed customers who are self-selecting and need to be recognized and rewarded. This goes to the heart of your customer retention, cross & upsell and will directly impact your cost of servicing customers. When I was working for a major European airport we knew that the airport didn’t have a direct relationship with travellers, nor much data about the millions of people using the airport, yet there was a prevailing school of thought that the mobile website was good enough, and there was no business case for upgrading the mobile app. For any frequent user of a service, logging into a website every time is a nightmare. This is an operational and cost of servicing issue. Customer experience, after all, is a COO problem really. This is even more true as employee apps take centre stage. So if your COO and head of Channels aren’t involved and sponsoring your mobile strategy it might be time to rethink.

The New New Stack: A Whole New Architecture: In the last few years there have been a very quick turnover of the preferred ways for building mobile apps. You only have to look at the rate of change of Gartner terminology – from MCAP to MEAP to MADP as the flavour of the month. Cut to today and none of those are preferred options anymore. The axis has shifted again. Most apps are being built today on light-weight front-end tools involving some flavour of Angular with loose coupling to the back end via APIs. A word on API management is worthwhile here. As a manager, you don’t need to know about SOAP or REST but think about this as a much more modular setup, where the API layer simply pushes information out in a governed manner to whichever channel requires it – be it the mobile app, the website or a partner.

To get a sense of how valuable the API layer has become consider that Apigee have recently been bought by Google. Mashery, another API management platform was first bought by Intel and then acquired from Intel by Tibco. Other majors including IBM and CA have their own solutions in the space. APIs themselves are not new but the way they are written now and the platform through which they are managed and governed are relatively new and you’re missing a trick if your business lacks an API strategy.

There are also a number of low-code or no-code platforms. Fliplet, for example, allows you to build simple, and functional mobile apps with little or no coding. Of course, this doesn’t include scenarios where you need to connect to other systems or consume APIs. But even those can be added with relatively low effort. In the Business to Employee world which is defined by a number of micro-applications, this is a very good option.

Exploit New Behaviours: New Technologies often engender new behaviours. Probably one of the most salient in recent times is the swipe left/ swipe right behaviour that was made popular by dating apps like Tinder. Understanding these behaviour patterns and using them is key to reducing friction for your processes. Another new ‘behaviour’ is the mobile only customer behaviour – i.e. somebody who would rather transact only on the mobile device. Uber is a very good example of how massive this can be, but you will definitely see customers in future at both ends of the age spectrum, whose only device is a mobile device rather than a laptop.

What new behaviours will we become used to over the next 5 years? Will it be the invisible payment mode of Uber? The voice interface of Amazon Echo/ Alexa? Or will we find more ways of self-quantification for our personal and professional lives? The good news is that you don’t have to create new behaviours. You just need to keep abreast of them and ensure you’re able to exploit them.