Welcome to the 1980s

Antique Telephone

Data Antiquity Award

A fortnight ago, I lost my debit card. I say lost, but my 4-year-old daughter discovered it under the car seat the next day. Of course, by then I had cancelled the card and my bank assured me that a new one was on it’s way. We could do that on the website – it was easier than calling on the phone and listening to ‘music’ for hours. As it turns out this was within a day of my wife’s card expiring, so she was also talking with the same bank for the same purpose – a new debit card.

Cards ordered, we could relax, and get on with our lives. Although we had to rely on using our credit cards at ATMs to withdraw cash. But a week passed and no cards showed up. So we got onto the phone and spoke with the advisor at the call centre. Imagine our surprise, when we were told that the card had been dispatched, but to our previous address – which we had left exactly 13 months ago. The bank didn’t know that we had moved. How was this possible? Even worse, they had my old mobile phone number – which I have not used in 6 months.

We moved house at the end of May 2014. Having done this a few times, we have a fairly comprehensive checklist for all the various updates. From utility providers, to post office, to banks to employers, it’s all there and we’re pretty sure we did it all. In fact, our credit cards, with the same bank have all the right information. We get the statements, and our online purchases go through with the new address confirmation. Absurdly, this information has not filtered through to the savings account side of my bank.

Let’s assume for a moment that we may have made a ‘mistake’ in informing the credit card issuer, and not the retail bank. Is this really a mistake though? As consumers, do we need to inform each part of the bank individually? How bizarre that in the 13 intervening months, the bank has not picked up the fact that our address for the credit card issued by them is different from the address for the debit cards issued by them. This, by the way, is a major high street bank in the UK. I’m not naming them because that’s not the point of this story.

And consider this: quite apart from the inconvenience and the confusion, the bank has effectively posted my card AND my pin to the wrong person. It’ll get sent by registered post – but as we know, anybody can really sign for it. The gentleman who now lives in our house is a very nice man, who hails from China and works in the City, in London. But what if he was a villainous man, easily tempted into transgression? How ironic is it that after all the effort of sending the card and pin in separate packs and taking all the precautions of masking the pin, it gets sent to the wrong person! A reminder that you’re only as secure as your weakest link!

And there were so many opportunities to get it right! Even a simple pop up while ordering the new card, to say thanks, we will be sending your card to this address, and showing the last 3 digits of the post code could be an easy way to trap this error. To be fair, Samir, the guy at the other end of the phone at the call centre, did what he could to rectify the errors and the bank has offered us a £60 payment as an apology. Assuming that the new cards get here by Monday, I’m inclined to get over this and move on. Of course, if the cards don’t arrive as expected, and we have go on holiday on Wednesday without them, I will have to tell them what to do with the £60, and it will not be polite.

Fresh from this brush with data antiquity, we ran into another one, this time a Harley Street clinic, who called my wife for an appointment. “Can you come tomorrow?” they said. We made a herculean effort to get there, the next day, beating tube strikes and insane traffic. The appointment was actually on the following day, and the doctor was unavailable. I asked them, why didn’t you send through a confirmation email which would have sorted out the error or misunderstanding? “Mumble mumble” was the only answer I got.

It seems to me that despite all the hype about connected worlds, smart products and big, gargantuan data, we’re still at the starting block in so many ways. I’ve been in London for 12 years now. I’ve never tweeted a single word about Bollywood, yet Twitter regularly asks me if I want to follow the latest Bollywood stars, or Indian TV personalities. And I’m sure many of you, like me, have been unwilling recipients of re-targeting ads – being told about great new folding cycles a month after you searched for and actually bought it. In all these ways, we’re still in the trough of digital disillusionment, to borrow a phrase from Gartner.

I guess the question left in my mind is, how many businesses, big and small are discussing big data and digital transformation projects before getting the basics right? How many are trying to leap into the 21st century, with one foot still stuck in the 1980s?  A good digital strategy should ensure an appropriate choice architecture which allows you to focus on getting the basics right while simultaneously creating a roadmap towards a bigger vision.

So the next time you encounter data-antiquity as a customer, or in your business, remember that in the digital era, there is no excuse for getting the basics right and that a good data foundation is at the heart of any digital transformation roadmap.
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