Meet The New Consumer

New consumer

The word revolution is overused, but in the past five odd years, there has been a significant change in how customers engage with products and service providers. Thanks to a combination of technologies, the consumer of 2015 is vastly different from 2010.

Let’s look at 6 specific points of change, which will reshape how you need to engage with consumers today.


The Encyclopaedia Effect: The Consumer Knows More
When a customer walks into a TV showroom today, the smart money is on the probability that he or she knows more about the product than the person behind the counter. In part this is exacerbated by the high turnaround and relative inexperience of shop floor staff, but also because consumers today have all the means and have learnt to thoroughly research their purchase – including features, price comparisons, technologies, accessories and performance. Contributing to this is the ease of garnering information via social media.

How ready are you to deal with this consumer? If you’re a retailer, is this a nightmare scenario or are you able to use this to your advantage? Do you arm your shop floor staff with information? Do you enable consumers to do their own research in the store? Do you provide enough authentic information out there for consumers – so they can trust your information?

In many ways, this puts the onus back squarely on the product or service delivery. You can no longer paper over the inferiority of your products through better marketing or better sales. This is a wake up call for product development and service design people. Get it right or you will be found out.

BYOW: Bring Your Own Web

When I last bought an airline ticket from Pune to Chennai in India, I asked the question on facebook about whether I should fly Airline X who had recently had some bad press and I wanted to check if it was a good idea to fly with them. About twenty people responded. Eighteen said it was a really bad idea (one person was being ironic and one was professionally involved with the airline). I was able to make a decision based on a cumulative 5 minutes of research.

It’s the internet to go. It’s carrying wikipedia, amazon, google and the the world’s product databases in your pocket. Earlier, the physical world and the digital world were distinct. You did your comparison shopping on the web and then took a print out to the store. Now you take the web with you to the store. You scan items with your phone and price compare then and there. Or pull up reviews

and product comparisons. Or check calorific values and nutritional advice. This is not a small evolutionary change. It is game changing.

We know that the mobile phone has already in larger or smaller measures replaced wrist watches, calculators, sat-navs & maps, time-tables and a host of other products. Even a spirit level, if you’re into DIY. But it’s ability to tap into the www wherever and whenever you like is arguably its killer app.

And what about your consumer? What is she checking for while selecting your product? Are you making it easier to find that information? Are you enabling or constricting this behaviour? Does your sales process factor in the always addressable consumer?

Generation M: Beyond Millenials

You’ve probably become accustomed to classifying yourself as a digital immigrant or a digital native. Maybe your kidds are the natives in your household. The “digital generation” aren’t even a homogenous group any more. The internet generation is a different breed from the mobile generation.

The mobile generation, or as Tammy Erickson calls it in this HBR article, the Re-Generation, was born around 1995 or later, is the generation that wants to swipe every screen they come across, and expects to be on multiple screens at the same time. This generation is all about expectations of connectivity, and being willing participants in solving issues – digital activists or at least aware of their role and influence by the virtue of a simple “like”.

If we are to go with this classification, this generation is about to enter the work force, armed with the ability to touch-text like their parents could touch-type. This generation can start a flash mob or, unfortunately, a riot from their hand held devices.

If you’ve been thinking about the “mobile-first” mantra – this is probably the generation of users it is critical for. Expect your first point of contact with consumers from this generation to be on the mobile device. Maybe even a significant part of all your interactions will be on the device. 

Perhaps it’s time to start thinking beyond mobile-first, to mobile-only. How geared up for you for this mobile-only relationship?

The Shazam Effect: Telescoping AIDA

Back then (10 years ago), you heard a song, you tried to find out what it was, maybe you heard it again, then on the radio. Somebody told you what the song was if you were able to hum it. Or you searched the lyrics on the internet. You went to the music store / Amazon and bought the cd, if it was worth the £7.99, or whatever the arbitrary price point for the cd was.

Now you hear and like a song that you’ve never heard before, you “Shazam” it, and it tells you the song, artist, and offers you the chance to buy it with a single click off itunes. In 30 seconds, from never having heard the song, you now own it.

This telescoping of the traditional “AIDA” marketing and sales cycle is what the mobile world is accelerating. Real time is in. Waiting is out. Consumers are starting to expect this in more and more areas. Whether its your bank account or your energy bill, or an itemized break up of your estimate for fitting out a new nursery, there is an increased expectation to make it available now.

How real time is your business? How long do customers have to wait for information about your products and services? How much self service do you enable in the information buffet?


The Interface is Dead: Long Live The Interface

We’ve argued about multi-screens, second-screens and even third screens, but what is happening now, is much more amorphous. The screen is vanishing, yet it’s everywhere. On your watch, in your line of sight from a wearable frame, on your shoes and in your car. In fact, sometimes it’s not a screen at all, just a natural interface. Think of Nest, or Amazon Echo, and it’s not a screen that comes to mind, is it? And once we get into the internet of things, the environment will be one giant interface.

With both computing and interfaces becoming much more amorphous, you and your consumer will always be connected in multiple ways. Are you ready for this kind of commitment?

Federated Identities

The two biggest challenges historically, used to be creating a single view of consumer data and marketing to a segment of one. Today, both are addressable with current technology. This project from Metlife, US is a great example of the former, and Amazon, Apple and Google all do a good job of the latter. The conceptual battle ground has moved. What’s even more granular than the individual? Federated identities.

Your customer in her office and your customer at the park with her kids are not really the same persona. Her needs are different, different receptors are at work, her emotional states are different. How can you tailor the messaging to this kind of contextual personas which are segments of an individual? This is very relevant if we’re going to talk about real time and always connected consumers. You have to model the different personas within a single person, based on context. This is your next assignment, should you accept it.

In Conclusion

These categories are just useful labels to stick onto a wide set of complex and ongoing changes. The journey isn’t over yet, but already, not recognising and adapting to these changes could mean that you are out of step with the consumer of today.